Rupert Murdoch Loves His iPad. But Is It A Revolution?

Apple iPad

The iPad

New Corp. boss Rupert Murdoch is all a-twitter about the first round of numbers on Wall Street Journal subscriptions on Apple’s new iPad.

In a conference call about the company’s latest results, Murdoch notes that WSJ subs on the iPad are much more profitable on the iPad than the Kindle, with the WSJ keeping all the $18 sub fee, while Amazon’s Kindle splits the proceeds. Murdoch says:

Unlike the Kindle, we keep 100 percent of the revenue from the iPad.

In the first month, the WSJ had 64,000 iPad subscribers.

Meanwhile, numbers from Apple show 1 million iPads sold in 28 days — more than twice as fast as the original iPhone. Apple CEO Steve Jobs says demand for the device continues to outpace supply.

So is the iPad truly a revolution? Perhaps no tech device  in recent memory has been this controversial. Some deride it as a giant iPhone that discourages creativity and corrals users in Apple’s restricted, Flash-less walled garden, while others say it introduces a revolutionary new form factor that puts an end to the PC era.

In the Northwest Arkansas Business Journal this week, guest columnist Steve Hankins, CEO and co-founder of tech firm Accio.US, notes people’s grumbles with the iPad but says like it or lump it, this thing’s a revolution:

While all of the criticisms of the iPad are technically correct, the point they make is that the technology status quo is again being threatened. This latest threat has finally caused the core technology people to rise up from their trees and get a view of the forest. And they don’t like what they see.

What most technology critics fail to understand is this simple concept: Most people want to use technology, not work on technology.

The convergence of the major trends in computing is changing the world that most technology people love into one that they are not so familiar with. Devices like the iPad do not seem to require the intervention of a technology person to enable the owner of the device to actually use it.

You read Hankins’ complete column here.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: